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SUMMER OF 2011

Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is available on the Web.
Point your browser to:
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE#7:
=================================
Emerald Ash Borer Detection
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=285

Emerald ash borer adults are likely to emerge within the next week or two in Illinois. In previous years, adults have started emerging in Chenoa, IL around June 8. Adults would be likely to start emerging in Illinois north of I-80 around mid-June.

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Emerald Ash Borer and Damage
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=286

Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis, is an exotic, invasive insect in North America that attacks and kills healthy ash trees. All ashes in the genus Fraxinus are attacked, including green, white, blue, and black ash.

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Bagworm
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=287

Bagworm eggs are hatching in southern Illinois and will soon be hatching in central and northern Illinois. Due to the ballooning of young larvae, it is most effective to wait for a couple of weeks after egg hatch to apply larval control sprays.

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Ryegrass -- the Unexpected Weed
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=288

Homeowners tend to be impatient. They want a green lawn and they want it done yesterday. There's no shortage of seed mixes on the market and marketing campaigns for that magazine perfect lawn. But the time you spend doing a little homework before you buy grass seed is certainly time well spent.

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New University of Illinois Plant Clinic Web Site and Podcasts
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=289

The new University of Illinois Plant Clinic web site was recently launched. This web site will provide a history of the Plant Clinic, a list of services offered by the Plant Clinic, help with sample submission, easy access to plant data forms, directions to the Plant Clinic, and staff contact information.

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Fireblight ... It's Back!
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=290

Fire blight is showing up across Illinois. We have been diagnosing it on Callery pear. But, fire blight can affect apples, pears, crabapples, and ornamental pears (yes, Callery pear). You might also see infection on other rosaceous hosts, such as cotoneaster, hawthorn, quince, firethorn, and mountain-ash.
=================================


IN THIS ISSUE#6:
=================================
Scouting Watch
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=279

Intermittent colder weather continues to slow down insect development in Illinois. As stated in an earlier issue of this newsletter, most insects do not develop at temperatures below 50 degrees F with slower development when temperatures are below the low 70's degrees F.

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Periodical Cicada
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=280

Periodical cicadas have emerged in those areas of the southern half of Illinois where it was expected. This is the Great Southern Brood, Marlatt's XIX, which is a thirteen year brood.

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Emerald Ash Borer Control
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=281

This is an ideal time to apply systemic insecticidal controls for emerald ash borer. Movement of systemic insecticides in a tree relies on transpiration, the loss of water from the leaves primarily through the stomata, resulting in a pulling of replacement water from the soil and up the trunk, bringing systemic insecticide with it.

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New Disorder of Spruce in Illinois: Sudden Needle Drop of Spruce (SNEED)
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=282

The University of Illinois Plant Clinic has received spruce samples from both central and northeastern Illinois that have been diagnosed with Sudden Needle Drop (SNEED) caused by Setomelanomma holmii. While SNEED has been found in several surrounding states, this is a first find in Illinois.

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Peach Leaf Curl
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=283

Peach leaf curl seems to be prevalent this spring. Mike Roegge, Educator in Adams/Brown Unit has received several questions about this disease and I have confirmed an infection of peach leaf curl on a peach tree in Montgomery County. Reports of this disease are not surprising, as this pathogen favors cool, moist weather.

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Storm Damage? Friendly Reminder about Moving Firewood
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=284

The recent storms that have swept across the state have left destruction in their wake - including downed trees and limbs. I'm sure there will be lots of activity in yards across the area in the coming days. But, are you aware of the dangers associated with invasive species and moving this debris?
=================================


IN THIS ISSUE#5:
=================================
Scouting Watch
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=275

Several borers and scale insects are susceptible to control at this time of year.

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Red Pine Sawfly
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=276

We have received a couple of reports of heavy feeding on loblolly and Eastern white pine in Harrisburg and Vienna in southeastern Illinois by what appears to be red pine sawfly larvae, Neodiprion nanulus nanulus. Large numbers of white worms are being reported on the foliage and trunks of the trees.

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CIA (Cerceris Identification and Awareness) for EAB
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=277

The Morton Arboretum is cooperating with the US Forest Service to explore the feasibility of using a native, non-stinging, ground-nesting wasp, Cerceris fumipennis, to locate emerald ash borer infestations.

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To Be Organic, or not to Be Organic, with Your Veggies and Manage Disease, That Is the Question?
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=278

We have had several "organic" vegetable samples submitted to the U of I Plant Clinic, due to the wet and favorable conditions for disease. All veggies (organic and conventional) can be susceptible to a plant pathogen (if it is present), and with just the right environmental conditions one can unfortunately get diseased plants!
=================================


=================================
IN THIS ISSUE#4:
=================================
Scouting Watch
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=270

Bridal wreath spirea, or Vanhoutte spirea, is blooming throughout the state. With phenology, stages of plant development (usually bloom time) are used to predict stages in pest development.

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Buffalo Gnats
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=271

We have received reports of large numbers of buffalo gnats, also known as black flies, attacking people particularly in the Springfield and Moline areas. Buffalo gnats are small, 1/16- to 1/8-inch-long, humpbacked black flies. They bite exposed skin, typically leaving a small, red welt.

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Gypsy Moth
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=272

Gypsy moth caterpillars hatch when common lilac, Syringa vulgaris, blooms. However, its main hosts, oaks, are typically just leafing out at that time. It is recommended to delay treatment until there is sufficient foliage expansion for sprays to have enough leaf surface to be effective.

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Selective Control for Nimblewill Now Available
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=273

For years, homeowners and professional lawncare applicators have had to rely on non-selective herbicides such as glyphosate when controlling nimblewill (Muhlenbergia schreberi) in residential lawns. Along with the nimblewill, non-target desirable plants such as bluegrass may be seriously injured or killed if contacted by glyphosate. Finally, we have a selective herbicide option for nimblewill.

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More on Stressed Spruce and Deep Planting
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=274

The U of I Plant Clinic continues to receive many spruce samples. These samples are examined and evaluated for disease, insects, and mites. The bulk of the recent samples, however, have not yielded a biotic cause of decline.
================================

=================================
IN THIS ISSUE#3:
=================================

Weather Effects on Insect Pests
The cool weather that we have had over the past week have kept insects somewhat at a standstill. Most insects do not develop at temperatures below 50 degrees F. They just sit as in suspended animation, not feeding or growing. Although they do feed and develop at temperatures in the 50's, they do so much slower than when temperatures are in the 70's and 80's.

Oystershell Scale
Oystershell scale feeds on a wide range of trees and shrubs, and is very capable of killing them. It feeds on at least 128 host species found in 19 genera in 12 plant families. This scale is most susceptible to crawler sprays, and crawlers are present and susceptible to control at this time of year.

Invasive Species Awareness Month
Did you know that May is Invasive Species Awareness Month (ISAM)? ISAM provides opportunities for all citizens of Illinois to participate in invasive species awareness events around the state. Events and programs are being held across the state and everyone is encouraged to attend and learn more about invasive species.

Henbit
In the past few weeks I've received a few phone calls concerning the identity of the purple flowers that are abundant in fields, lawns, and landscapes now. Although there are a couple of weeds they could be, odds are that sea of lavender that you see across the state is really henbit (Lamium amplexicaula).

Watch Out For Anthracnose
Rains have been plentiful and temperatures have been cool. This weather has been ideal for the development of anthracnose on shade trees just as tender leaves are first developing. Anthracnose causes water-soaked leaf spots ranging in color from dark green to brown.


=================================
IN THIS ISSUE#2:
=================================
Scouting Watch
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=262

Several insects to be on the lookout for are discussed.

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Periodical Cicada
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=263

Periodical cicadas are scheduled to emerge this year in most of the southern half of Illinois as part of the Great Southern Brood, Marlatt's XIX brood. Emergence is expected in mid to late May.

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SOS: Help My Spruce is Dying!
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=264

The Plant Clinic received many calls about Spruce tree problems, often times, with the same description of symptoms. Several of the possible causes are discussed.
=================================
=================================
IN THIS ISSUE#1:
=================================
First Issue for 2011
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=256

This is the first issue of the Home, Yard, and Garden Pest Newsletter for 2011. We plan on having 18 issues through the growing season.

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Pest Watch
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=257

There are numerous insect and mite pests that are active and controllable at this time.

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Spruce Spidermite
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=258

Spruce spidermite and its relatives, pine mite, arborvitae mite, and juniper mite, actively feed during early spring and early fall. They spend the summer as eggs on the host. Most miticides are effective primarily against active, feeding stages, providing little control of eggs.

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Japanese Beetle Control
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=259

Adult Japanese beetles feed on the upper leaves of crabapple, linden, serviceberry, flowering cherry, birch, willow, rose, and many other trees and shrubs from late June through mid-August. They can defoliate or window-feed at least the upper third of the tree.

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Change at the University of Illinois Plant Clinic
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=260

The University of Illinois Plant Clinic will open its doors for the 2011 season on Monday, May 2nd. New staff members include Suzanne Bissonnette and Stephanie Porter.

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Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Found in Illinois
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=261

The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) has been making headlines in Illinois the past couple of weeks. After the first confirmation of this invasive insect was reported in the fall of 2010 (Cook County), additional reports have continued to in 2011.
=================================


SUMMER OF 2010 - 17 ISSUES

Issue no. 17 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
Last Biweekly Issue
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=248

This is the last of the Home, Yard, and Garden Pest Newsletter issues published every other week for 2010.

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Emerald Ash Borer Update
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=249

The emerald ash borer (EAB) has been found in Champaign County at Prairie Pine Campgrounds in Rantoul and in Grundy County at the Three Rivers Rest
Area on I-80 in Morris.

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Magnolia Scale
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=250

Magnolia scale is heavy this year in northern and central Illinois. It is susceptible to control from now into spring.

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Whiteflies
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=251

Whitefly adults are very common on many outdoor different plants. At this time of year, they are unlikely to cause serious damage to temperate plants.

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White Grubs and May Beetles
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=252

White grubs are still susceptible to treatment until the soil temperature in the turf root zone drops below 60 degrees F. That is the temperature at which Japanese beetle grubs descend deeper into the soil for the winter.
=================================


Issue no. 16 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
Thousand Cankers Disease
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=245

Thousand cankers disease, Geosmithia sp., and its vector, walnut twig beetle has been found in black walnut, Juglans nigra, for several years from the Rocky Mountains on west. In August, it was found in the Knoxville, Tennessee area.

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Walnut Twig Beetle
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=246

Many cankers of thousand cankers disease on black walnut contain tunnels of walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis, on their surface. The walnut twig beetle is a bark beetle, Family Scolytidae, that is very tiny, only about one and one-half millimeters long (one-twentieth of an inch long).

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Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=247

Yellow-bellied sapsuckers attack Illinois trees during both spring and fall migrations through the state. These woodpeckers typically fly south through Illinois from about mid-September through October, and they fly back north in the spring from early April through mid-May.
=================================


No. 15/August 27, 2010

Whiteflies
Whiteflies are being found commonly in the landscape, feeding on the leaves of flowers and other herbaceous plants as well as hydrangea, other shrubs, and trees. Generally, late season whiteflies can be ignored, as they are too late to cause serious damage to plant health or even cause obvious aesthetic damage.

White Pine Sawfly
White pine sawfly larvae have been reported from Henry County in northwestern Illinois and Champaign County in east central Illinois feeding on white pine. White pine sawfly, Neodiprion pinetum, feeds on both the younger and older needles of white pine, mugo, and red pines, resulting in branches completely stripped of foliage.

Redheaded Pine Sawfly
Redheaded pine sawfly feeds primarily on two- and three-needle pines, being particularly common on Scotch, jack, and red pines. It also feeds on five-needle pines, Norway spruce, and larch growing near two- or three-needle pines. It tends to prefer weakened trees, those growing in poor sites, stressed by drought, or growing in competition with other plants.

White Grubs
White grubs in moderately damaging numbers have been reported in east central Illinois. Be vigilant for wilting and browning turf areas.

University of Illinois Plant Clinic Seasonal Closing Notice
It is almost time for the Plant Clinic to close its doors for the season. Wednesday, September 15th, is the last day of operation for this year.

=================================
Issue no. 14 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
Moths Numerous
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=236

Celery leaftier moths are very numerous in central and northern Illinois. These moths are brownish and about one-quarter inch long. Their wings form a triangular shape when they are at rest.

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Rabbits
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=237

The rabbit species that primarily causes damage to trees and shrubs in Illinois is the Eastern cottontail. Cottontails cause serious damage to shrubs and small trees by stripping off the bark during the winter.

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White Grubs
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=238

White grub damage to turf typically appears in the second half of August, continuing into October. Damage will appear as wilted, light tan turf in which the sod is easily pulled up. In heavily damaged areas, the turf can be rolled back like a carpet.

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Invasive Plant, Pest & Disease Awareness: Do you know the part you play in environmental defense?
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=239

The USDA has announced that August is officially 'Invasive Plant, Pest, and Disease Awareness Month' in an attempt to increase public awareness of these invasive organisms and the threats they pose. More and more invasive species are being discovered and the problems they pose are serious.
=================================



Issue no. 13 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
Bagworms
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=228

Bagworms continue to be numerous throughout the state with many bags being about one and one-half inch long and others much smaller at about three-fourths to one inch long.

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Zimmerman Pine Moth
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=229

Zimmerman pine moth should be susceptible to control in southern Illinois at this time. Treatment in northern Illinois should occur around mid-August. Permethrin, sold as Astro and other trade names, will be effective for several weeks sprayed on the trunk and larger branches.

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Japanese Beetle Resistant Elms
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=230

Research published in May, 2010 by Jennie M. Condra, Christina M. Brady, and Daniel A. Potter of the University of Kentucky provides Japanese beetle resistance information for Dutch elm disease resistant elms.

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Bacterial Leaf Scorch Treatment
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=231

For many years I have been advocating testing of oaks for bacterial leaf scorch (BLS). This disease is a silent killer of sorts. It is caused by a bacterium, Xyllela fastidiosa, which lives only in the xylem tissues.

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Hosta Petiole Blight
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=232

This past week we had a beautiful case of hosta petiole blight. I beg the pardon of the grower whose hosta was devastated by this disease. It is truly amazing that a fungal pathogen can so totally take over a large, otherwise healthy, hosta, causing all of its leaves to collapse.

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Thank You and Farewell
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=233

This is my last article for the Home, Yard, and Garden Pest Newsletter. I want to take this opportunity to thank my loyal readers, as well as those who are new to the newsletter, for taking the time to read and question what we have to say. I am about to start my next phase of life--retirement.

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Asiatic Garden Beetle
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=234

An accidental import from Japan and China in the 1920's, the Asiatic Garden Beetle has expanded its range to cover much of northeastern North America. It is commonly found from New England to Ohio and down to South Carolina. In 2009, the Asiatic garden beetle was found in traps in St. Clair County in Illinois.

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Asian Longhorned Beetle: Your Vigilance Can Save Trees
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=235

The Asian longhorned beetle (Anaplophora glabripennis), a native of China, was brought to the United States in wood packing material. This insect is a serious pest even in its native range. Here in the United States, where it has no natural predators, it is of even more concern.
=================================



Issue no. 12 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
White Grubs
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=220

Preventative treatment for white grubs is recommended to watered turf in those areas of the state where rainfall has been slight and non-irrigated turf is dry and dormant.

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Sod Webworms
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=221

High numbers of sod webworm adults have been noticed around lights and in light traps. There are several species of sod webworms that are damaging to turf, but the adult moths look similar. They have light tan wings that are held tight against the body, giving the body a tube-like appearance.

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Cicada Killer and Velvet Ant
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=222

Cicada killers are becoming numerous in turf areas. Adult cicada killers are large wasps, about 2 inches long and black, with yellow band-like marks. Velvet ants are parasites of cicada killer and bumblebee nests.

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Peony Powdery Mildew
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=223

A recent peony sample at the University of Illinois Plant Clinic was covered with powdery mildew. The disease can be identified by its white, powdery growth covering the foliage.

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Cherry Leaf Spot
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=224

A current problem on edible and ornamental cherries in Illinois is cherry leaf spot, caused by the fungus, Blumeriella jaapii. The pathogen is also known by one of its synonyms, Coccomyces hiemalis.

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Foliar Nematode of Hosta
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=225

The foliar nematode is a pathogen in the genus Aphelenchoides. It lives in the plant foliage, not in the roots or soil.

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Highway Invasives: Road Spread Weeds
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=226

Roadways and highways are becoming one of the major pathways by which invasive plants spread. Wind and air movement from passing vehicles help disperse seeds. Cutting and mowing, and regular road maintenance activities can aid in the spread of these invasives.

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Brown Marmorated Stink Bug: Know This Invasive!
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=227

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys) is native to Asia but has been transported to the United States and found in many states in the eastern U.S. Its presence in Illinois is unknown.
=================================

Issue no. 11 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
Last Weekly Issue
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=214

This is the last weekly issue of the Home, Yard, and Garden Pest Newsletter for 2010. We will continue with issues every other week through July, August, and September. We will follow with a final issue in late October.

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White Grubs
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=215

Japanese beetles and masked chafers are actively laying eggs at this time in turfgrass. The severity of this infestation is primarily governed by the adult population size and rainfall patterns.

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Diplodia Blight Vs Pine Wilt and Dothistroma Blight
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=216

We have seen quite a bit of Diplodia blight on pines lately through the clinic. Many Plant Clinic clients ask for help in distinguishing this disease from pine wilt or Dothistroma blight. All three diseases will cause needles to turn brown.

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Spruce Rhizosphaera Vs. Cytospora
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=217

Rhizosphaera needle cast has been a common Plant Clinic sample in the last two weeks. Spruce trees with purple/brown one- and two-year-old needles are suspect. The newest growth will appear green. Affected needles are cast (dropped).

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Bacterial Blight of Ornamentals
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=218

Bacterial blight, caused by Pseudomonas syringae, has been common this past spring and early summer. In most plant pathology literature, Pseudomonas syringae is considered a weak pathogen. It requires a wound to enter the plant and does most damage to plants under stress.

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Common Teasel: Highway Invasive
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=219

Teasel is a frequent sight along Illinois roadways and in abandoned lots. This plant was introduced in the 1700's from Europe, most likely as an ornamental. Teasel prefers open and sunny habitats, often along roadsides and at disturbed sites. Once established in an area, teasel will crowd out native plants and reduce plant diversity.
=================================


Issue no. 10 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

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Malcolm C. Shurtleff
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=206

Malcolm C. Shurtleff, former author of this newsletter and many University of Illinois Extension publications, died on May 29, 2010 in Pearland Texas. He was almost 88 years of age at the time of death.

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Scouting Watch
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=207

Japanese beetle, pine spittlebug, and magnolia scale are the subject this week.

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Pythium Root Rot of Garden Plants
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=208

Root rot problems are often difficult to diagnose and can be confused with environmental stress. Above-ground root rot symptoms might include stunted growth, smaller than normal leaves, poor foliar color, dieback of stems, or sudden wilt and death of plants. Plants with Pythium root rot will have blackened root tips or soft, dark rot of the outer (cortex layer) of the roots.

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Watch for Oak Wilt
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=209

As the season progresses, we see many oaks that look stressed. How do we know the cause of the stress? Some possible causes include Armillaria root rot, root compaction or injury, severe oak anthracnose, bacterial leaf scorch, and oak wilt.

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Pine Wilt
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=210

Pine Wilt is the only vascular disease of pines. It is much like Verticillium wilt on deciduous trees except the pathogen is a nematode rather than a fungus. Pinewood nematode is the cause of Pine Wilt. It moves from tree to tree by way of sawyer beetles.

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Transporting Invasive Species--What's hiding in your tree?
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=211

The recent storms that have swept across the state have left destruction in their wake--including downed trees and limbs. We've received numerous calls about what can be done with this green waste. Many cities have organized storm pick up or maybe even a green waste recycling center. But are you aware of the dangers associated with invasive species and moving this debris and firewood?

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Saltcedar: Watch Out for This Weed!
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=212

Saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) is an invasive weed that poses a large threat to native ecosystems and local water tables.  This plant is a native of Asia and Europe and was originally brought over in the early 1800's to be used as an ornamental and later for erosion control and wind breaks.

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Aquatic Invasives: Brazilian Elodea and Hydrilla
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=213

There are two invasive species threatening America's waterways- Brazilian elodea (Egeria densa) and hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata). Hydrilla is a persistent problem throughout North America while Brazilian elodea only survives in the north.
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Issue no. 9 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
International Herb Conference
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=197

The International Herb Association is holding its annual conference this year in Collinsville, Illinois on Saturday, July 10 through Monday, July 12, at the DoubleTree Hotel (618) 345-2800. Pre- and Post-Conference tours will be held on Friday, July 9, and Tuesday, July 13.

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NPDES Webcast Postponed
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=198

Due to technical difficulties with the webcast vendor, EPA's Draft NPDES Pesticides General Permit (PGP) webcast has been postponed to Thursday, June 24th at 1:00 pm EDT.

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Warm Spring Causes Early Insect Emergence
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=199

Central and northern Illinois has had a warm spring this year. This is probably causing several insects including bagworm, Japanese beetle, and the masked chafers to emerge early this year in those areas of the state.

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Japanese Beetle
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=200

Japanese beetles are emerging throughout the state. The warm spring weather in northern and southern Illinois has probably resulted in their emerging early in the northern two-thirds of the state.

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Dutch Elm Disease or Elm Yellows?
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=201

A distinction is made between Dutch elm disease and elm yellows, both of which cause decline and the death of elm trees.

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Slime Molds, Mushrooms, and Algae, Oh My!
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=202

Everyone seems to understand the value of landscape mulch. It does, unfortunately, have a few inhabitants that are offensive to people. There are aesthetic problems like slime molds and mushrooms. There are also some health and safety concerns such as mushrooms and algae.

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Wetwood
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=203

Wetwood is a condition caused by bacteria that enter wounds in a tree. Although you see the oozing, wet areas coming from cracks in the wood, the bacteria usually enter wounds in the roots. Other than sound horticultural practices, you probably cannot do anything to stop the condition.

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Viburnum Leaf Beetle: Garden Menace
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=204

Viburnum is one of America's most popular shrubs because of its beautiful flowers and wildlife attracting berries. However, this pretty plant is being threatened by the invasive viburnum leaf beetle (Pyrrhalta viburni), a native of Europe that has been moved to North America on infected viburnums.

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Beautiful but Dangerous: What You Should Know About Purple Loosestrife
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=205

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) has become a common site in many places in the United States, including Illinois. This plant's prevelance and beautiful appearance causes many to write it off as a harmless wild flower. However, purple loosestrife is a very aggresive non-native plant that posses a very real ecological and economic threat.
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Issue no. 8 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

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Cottony Maple Scale
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=190

Cottony maple scale, Pulvinaria innumerabilis, is very common this year in northeastern Illinois. This insect occurs in the northern half of Illinois, as far south as Danville and Lincoln. Cottony maple scale occurs most commonly on silver maple, but is also common on other maples including box elder. It is also common on black walnut, honey locust, linden, black locust, red mulberry, and white ash.

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Twicestabbed Lady Beetle
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=191

The adult twicestabbed lady beetle is one-eighth inch in diameter and black with two red spots on the back. It overwinters under loose bark as an adult beetle, emerging in the spring to feed on the overwintered cottony maple scales through the spring.

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Cottony Maple Scale Management
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=192

Control of cottony maple scale can be achieved in several ways. Letting nature take its course and allowing the twicestabbed lady beetles to provide control is one option. Another is to apply a crawler spray after the cottony maple scale crawlers hatch about mid-July. Acephate (Orthene), acetamiprid (TriStar), bifenthrin (Talstar, Onyx), cyfluthrin (Tempo), insecticidal soap, malathion, and summer spray oil are all effective crawler sprays.

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Scouting Watch
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=193

Bagworms, earwigs, and grass sawfly are the subject for this week's scouting watch.

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Friend or Foe: Giant Hogweed and Its Look-alikes
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=194

Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is a member of the carrot or parsnip family (Apiaceae). While many members of this family are native to Illinois, Giant hogweed is an invasive species that was brought from Asia in the 1900's. This plant was most likely brought as an ornamental because of its showy white flowers and impressive size. However, it is very aggressive and noxious.

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Hemlock Wooly Adelgid: Know This Tree Killer!
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=195

The Hemlock Wooly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) is an invasive species that was brought from Japan to the Western United States in the 1920's. The insect has since moved east and can now be found in Georgia, the Carolinas, through the Appalachian Mountains and in parts of the New England area. The Hemlock Wooly Adelgid is of particular concern because, unlike the Hemlocks in its native range in Japan, American hemlock species have no defenses against it.

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Additional notes on NPDES General Permit Comment Period
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=196

In last week's issue, notice was given of a NPDES General Permit Comment Period. It seems that this EPA announcement (and the whole concept of requiring NPDES permits) has spurred considerably more questions than answers. We in the Pesticide Safety Education Program are currently unclear about the exact scope of this matter and we encourage all pesticide applicators to participate in these sessions, ask questions, and submit comments.
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Issue no. 7 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

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NPDES General Permit Comment Period
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=182

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced the public availability of a draft National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for point source discharges from the application of pesticides to waters of the United States. This Pesticides General Permit (PGP) was developed in response to a decision by the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in which the court vacated EPA's 2006 rule that said NPDES permits were not required for applications of pesticides to U.S. waters.

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Emerald Ash Borer Treatments
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=183

The recent discoveries of additional infestations of emerald ash borer in Illinois and surrounding states have increased concern among tree owners of the need to treat their ash trees with insecticide to protect them from this pest. Part of this concern arises from no known cases of survival of untreated ash trees when attacked by this insect.

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European Elm Flea Weevil
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=184

European elm flea weevil, Orchestes alni, is feeding throughout the state. This is a tiny insect, about only 1/16 inch long. It is reddish, with black spots on the wing covers, and has on elongated snout with tiny mouthparts at the end. Adults overwinter, emerging in the spring to feed on leaves of Eurasian elms, including Siberian elm, where the damage is most noticeable.

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Fire Blight of Ornamental Pear
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=185

This has been the week for symptom expression of fire blight on ornamental pear, at least in parts of Illinois. I have heard of multiple samples in Champaign, Sangamon, and Vermilion counties. We have received physical samples from Champaign and St. Clair counties. Symptoms seen now were initiated by infections from 5 to 30 days ago.

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Cryptodiaporthe Canker of Pagoda Dogwood
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=186

Although resistant to most diseases, pagoda dogwood usually succumbs to Cryptodiaporthe canker when it reaches the ripe age of 20-25 years. Cryptodiaporthe canker is also known as the golden canker, due to the yellow-orange color of infected bark.

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Rhododendrons Limited by More than Phytophthora Root Rot
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=187

If you have a rhododendron that is suffering but does not have Phytophthora root rot, consider the possibilities of Botryosphaeria canker or Armillaria root rot. Also consider noninfectious possibilities such as poor drainage, wet conditions, deep or shallow planting, and other abiotic factors. Diseases are not always the problem.

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On the Watch for Gypsy Moth
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=188

One of the most notorious hitchhiking insects, the gypsy moth, is also one of the most destructive forest pests in the United States. This defoliator is a voracious eater; and when populations are high, they can devour all of the leaves from the trees and plants in a neighborhood.

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Know Your Invasives: More Native Plant Resources
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=189

I received some great feedback from my article on "Learning to Identify Locally Invasive Plants," particularly on supplying some resources on alternative planting for gardens. Following that same theme, here are some resources that I've provided over time on our Illinois Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey Program blog where you can find some of the latest news on invasives in Illinois.
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Issue no. 6 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
Gypsy Moth
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=174

Gypsy moth caterpillars hatch when common lilac, Syringa vulgaris, blooms. However, its main hosts, oaks, are typically just leafing out at that time. It is recommended to delay treatment until there is sufficient foliage expansion for sprays to have enough leaf surface to be effective.

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Boxwood Psyllid
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=175

Boxwood psyllid, Psylla buxi, can be found feeding on boxwood in many portions of Illinois. Boxwood psyllids are small (1/16-inch), grayish green insects that are normally covered with a white, waxy, filamentous secretion that partially covers the body, providing protection from parasitoids and sprays of pest-control materials. Winged adults appear in late May and June.

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Hawthorn Mealybug
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=176

Hawthorn mealybug is being found in high numbers on cotoneaster in northeastern Illinois. Hawthorn mealybug, Phenacoccus dearnessi, is also known as two-circuli mealybug. It feeds on hawthorn, cotoneaster, pyracantha, mountain ash, amelanchier, and other rose family plants.

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Helpful Info from NPDN
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=177

The National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN) is indeed a network of people employed at land grant universities, federal agencies (such as APHIS), and state departments of agriculture, consultants, and other stakeholders.

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Know Your Invasives: Garlic Mustard
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=178

One of the seemingly fastest moving invasive plants in Illinois is garlic mustard. In fact, in one Illinois study, it advanced an average of 20 feet per year, expanding as much as 120 feet per year. It aggressively invades forested areas and can be found along roadsides as well. It likes shaded areas, especially disturbed sites and open woodland.

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On the Watch for Emerald Ash Borer
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=179

This metallic green beetle was recently found in Iroquois county, just north of Loda. Citizens are asked to be on the lookout for this invasive pest, but do you know what you are looking for?

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Raspberry Orange Rust
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=180

Customers growing raspberries other than red raspberry may be seeing an orange growth on the leaves now. This is a fungal disease called orange rust that infects blackberry, black raspberry and purple raspberry. Red raspberry is resistant. Raspberry orange rust should not be confused with the late leaf rust disease of red raspberries.

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Anthracnose Update
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=181

This spring, many plants have become infected with anthracnose. There are several similar fungi that cause anthracnose diseases. Most of these fungi infect foliage and overwinter on the dead leaves.
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Issue no. 5 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
Aphids
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=167

High populations of aphids have been reported in northeastern Illinois. With warmer, drier weather in the forecast, other areas of the state may see high populations as well in the next couple weeks.

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Spider Webs
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=168

The high winds in the last couple of weeks have resulting in masses of webbing on turf and trees. When spiders hatch, each disperses by spinning out a long strand of silk, which catches in the wind and allows them to float for long distances to new locations.

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Plant Bugs
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=169

Fourlined plant bug is a pest on mint, lavendar, sage, artemisia, sunflower, and other herbs. It is particlarly a problem on mint, being its most severe pest. Damage appears as contorted leaves with brown to black spots.

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Rose Downy Mildew
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=170

We have had a few reports of downy mildew on rose. I doubt home growers will see this problem, but it is something to watch for this spring.

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Ivy Leaf Spots
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=171

There are commonly two types of leaf diseases on English ivy used as ground covers in landscape beds. We see them both fairly frequently in Illinois. The first is caused by one or more fungi and the other is caused by a bacterium.

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Know Your Invasives: Learn to Identify Locally Invasive Plants
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=172

During a time of year when gardens are being planted, crops are being cultivated, and yards are being adorned with flowers, it is ever so important to be able to recognize what plants are invasive.

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On the Watch for Invasives
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=173

In today's era of globalization, the risk of invasive plant pest introductions is increasing. While a central geographic location and a superior transportation system afford Illinois a competitive advantage over many other states, these same factors make Illinois extremely vulnerable to accidentally or purposely introduced exotic pests.
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Issue no. 4 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
Roundheaded Appletree Borer
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=160

Most roundheaded borers attack dying or dead trees, but there are a few exceptions, Asian longhorned beetle, linden borer, and roundheaded appletree borer being among them. Roundheaded appletree borer attacks rose family plants including hawthorn, mountain ash, quince, serviceberry (shadbush), cotoneaster, and crabapple.

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Flatheaded Appletree Borer
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=161

Flatheaded appletree borer attacks trees in the rose family, being common in older hawthorn, serviceberry, cotoneaster, rose, and crabapple branches and trunks where it primarily attacks declining trees and shrubs near the end of their lifespan.

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Mimosa Webworm
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=162

Mimosa webworm is susceptible to control at this time in southern Illinois. Spraying the foliage of attacked trees with Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki (Dipel, Thuricide), spinosad (Conserve), or labeled pyrethroid insecticide at this time should provide control.

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Daylily Leaf Streak
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=163

Daylily foliage is looking lush in most parts of the state. In some of the wetter areas we have seen daylily leaf streak.

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Crabapple Scab Note
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=164

Although we have not seen much in the way of apple scab in Champaign/Urbana as yet, it is beginning. Temperatures have been above average and moisture below average, until this past week.

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Birch Anthracnose, Chlorosis, and More
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=165

Anthracnose is a common spring disease, especially in cool, wet conditions. Since those conditions occur in Illinois every year, we see anthracnose every year. There are many fungi that cause anthracnose diseases on many hosts. It is not just one big, powerful pathogen.

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Japanese Tree Lilac Diseases
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=166

Japanese tree lilac (Syringa reticulata) has become a very popular plant in Illinois. The good news is that so far the disease problems seem few and sparse.
=================================

Issue no. 3 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
Scouting Watch
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=152

Several insects you should be watchful for are highlighted this week.

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Mite Leaf Galls
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=153

There are a number of eriophyid mite species that cause galls on trees at this time of year. Generally, these mites spend the winter under bud scales, then leaving the buds to attack expanding leaves.

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Armored Scale Insects
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=154

There are a number of armored scale insects that are producing crawlers at this time of year in Illinois. Crawlers are the first stage nymphs and are very susceptible to contact insecticide sprays.

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Purple EAB Traps are Back
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=155

Illinois Department of Agriculture personnel, USDA personnel, and others have been installing the large purple emerald ash borer traps over the last few weeks.

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Problems with Verticillium Wilt?
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=156

Verticillium wilt knows no age barrier, killing plants ranging from tomato to mature maples. The fungus causes a tell-tale vascular streaking in the stems and roots of infected plants.

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Anthracnose Vs Environmental Stress
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=157

Anthracnose fungi invade in wet conditions. In the mid-section of the state, weather has been rather dry. On the other hand, infection only requires several hours of leaf wetness, so anthracnose is certainly a possibility.

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May is Invasive Species Awareness Month in Illinois
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=158

The Illinois Invasive Plant Species Council is declaring May to be Invasive Species Awareness Month. The Council along with many conservation organizations and agencies in Illinois are working together to promote awareness of the impact of invasive species to Illinois' diverse landscape.

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Bee Careful, Those Critters Might be More Important than You Realize
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=159

Recently, honey bees have come under a great deal of stress due to a relatively new malady called colony collapse disorder (CCD). First reported in 2006, CCD is characterized by a sudden disappearance of most of the worker bees in a hive, leaving only the queen and a few attendants.
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Issue no. 2 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
Newsletter Weekly for Next Two Months
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=142

We will have weekly issues of the Home, Yard, and Garden Pest Newsletter during May and June. In July, we will switch to an every two-week publishing schedule.

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Pest Management Timing Using Phenology
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=143

With phenology, stages of plant development (usually bloom time) are used to predict stages in pest development. This method is more accurate than using calendar dates because the plant is exposed to the same climatic conditions as the disease or insect pest.

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Scouting Watch
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=144

Common pests of bridal wreath spirea are highlighted.

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Bristly Rose Slug
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=145

Effective management solutions for bristly rose slug are discussed.

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Galls, Galls, Galls
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=146

Spring commonly brings large numbers of leaf galls, with oaks having the greatest share of leaf and other galls. Galls are plant growths formed due to stimuli provided by insects, mites, disease organisms, or mechanical injury.

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Buffalo Gnats
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=147

We are getting reports of buffalo gnats in large numbers in the Springfield area. They are common most springs in the northern two-thirds of Illinois.

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Dying White Pines
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=148

It is a bit early in the season for these calls, but I have already had several inquiries concerning dying white pines. We usually refer to this situation as white pine decline, for want of an exact cause of tree death.

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Crabapple Scab Scenario?
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=149

Crabapple scab was more severe in 2009 than I have seen it in the past 20 years.

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Tree Declines
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=150

In many cases we see slow reduction in tree growth and vitality of a tree. This may be the result of many stress factors. Often those factors cannot be pinpointed.

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Where Have All the Flowers Gone?
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=151

Dahlias, tulips, and iris are some examples of plants that often have flowering difficulties, leaving the consumer to wonder what happened.
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Issue no. 1 of the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter is now available on the Web. Point your browser to:

http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu


IN THIS ISSUE:

=================================
First Issue for 2010
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=134

This is the first issue of the Home, Yard, and Garden Pest Newsletter for 2010. In each issue, we provide information about plant diseases and insect pests that are occurring or about to occur throughout the state.

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Commercial Handbook Available
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=135

The 2010 Illinois Commercial Landscape and Turfgrass Pest Management Handbook is available. This publication provides management recommendations for diseases, weeds, and insect pests associated with trees, shrubs, turf, and flowers for professionals including arborists, turf care professionals, landscapers, golf course personnel, nurserymen, and garden center operators.

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Pin Oak Gall Larvae
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=136

We have received reports of large numbers of larvae being found under pin oak trees in the Springfield area. Based on somewhat sketchy information, these appear to be the mature larvae of a gall midge in the genus Contarinia.

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Emerald Ash Borer
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=137

The Illinois Department of Agriculture (IDOA) has added Ford and Iroquois counties to its emerald ash borer (EAB) quarantine. The expansion became necessary after the discovery of the destructive beetle outside the boundaries of the former quarantine in March.

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Scouting Watch
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=138

Eastern tent caterpillar and European pine sawfly are profiled.

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Plant Clinic Season Opener May 3rd
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=139

The University of Illinois Plant Clinic will open its doors for the 2010 season beginning at 8am on Monday, May 3rd. A few of the staff members are different this year, but hours, fees, and services remain the same as the 2009 season.

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Sudden Oak Death Update
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=140

Sudden oak death is a disease that kills oaks. It is present in California, Oregon, and Washington. The cause is a fungal-like pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum.

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Boxwood Problems Remain
http://hyg.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=141

Calls about boxwood problems started for me about two years ago. I continue to receive calls concerning boxwoods, and the problem is the same.
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